A Verdict

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called A Verdict.  

About the Black Out Poem and A Verdict

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

A Verdict

Holding the banister
Billowing sleeve
Hard heel
Decorated with mud
Shed fur
Salad-creamed fingers
The pepper pot mangled
Escaped spinning
Left to overbalance
Dropping
Not discouraged
An orange
Old dry segments
An eggcup
Undiscerning horseshoe
Deeply occupying
Enchanting
Morbid curiosity
An alluring song
Wasn’t technically 
A verdict
The familiar room
Yellow light
Wicker shade
As it had been
reassured

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Ugly Glance
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …

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Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 175 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 175 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful our friend in the hospital is doing better today. Rooster and I visited him, and he surprised us by sitting in a chair the entire time. We noticed the color had returned to his face as soon as we walked into the room. His oxygen levels are in the normal range, and he had a smile on his face. He claims they will release him by the weekend. I am grateful for his increase in health.

This old lady is happy her friend is feeling better.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Ugly Glance
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …

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A Bitchy Slant

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called A Bitchy Slant.  

About the Black Out Poem and A Bitchy Slant

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

A Bitchy Slant

Intriguing enough
Smile like roses full of snow
Something similar
Nice smile
Hooked fang
Curving tusks
No roses
Haggis shards
Repeating its journey
Please do carry on
With disgust
A solution came
I’ve got the garden
Pretending at ignorance
Careful 
Bitchy slant eyes
Unsavory
Patronising
Fidgeted
Shifting around
“Okay
Fine.”
Manipulated easily

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Ugly Glance
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …

4 thoughts on “A Bitchy Slant

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Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 174 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 174 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful to enjoy breakfast with my daughter and son-in-law. We aren’t able to do this often, especially now that prices are out of control. The four of us sat at a local restaurant and enjoyed a nice meal. They are going on vacation. I hope they have a great time on the trip they plan to take. I am thinking about hiding out in their luggage. I am grateful for the time we spent together today.

This old lady misses her baby chicks.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Ugly Glance
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …

Leave a Reply

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Ugly Glance

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called Ugly Glance.  

About the Black Out Poem and Ugly Glance

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

Ugly Glance

Struggled against
Ferocious will
Remembered
Measured destruction
Broke in moonless waves
Waiting to guide him back
Surface liberated
The days would pass
The water would return
A gradual process
Own Momentum
Light on the shoreline
Nowhere particular
The despairing search
Had narrowed
The black nostrils
Ugly glance as a standing ovation.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Day 173 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 173 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 173 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 173 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful to spot a gas station up the road. It’s always a welcome sight when you are on a road trip. I won’t lie because I needed to use the bathroom facilities in the worst way. Rooster became overjoyed at the sighting as well. He knows the situation becomes a minor emergency when I say I have to go. We made it to the service station just in time. Rooster wasn’t happy about the price of gas. He complained about it for the next twenty miles. I am grateful for the oasis of petrol we discovered in the middle of the miles of corn.

This old lady had to go.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 173 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

  1. Woke up sick this morning. 🤧 But today I am thankful for the wonderful holiday we just had, with the most amazing scenery. I am so grateful for my hubby, my dogs, all the wonderful people in my life. Even for the wind which is blowing at almost galeforce outside. Life is a blessing.

    Sending some Love and Light your way.

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The Farm at Prophetstown

Rooster and I had a day to play on the motorcycle. The Bossy Posse went to spend time with their dad. We discovered a unique event at the Farm at Prophetstown, so we decided to go check out this replica of a 1920’s farmstead in Battle Ground, Indiana. Our granddaughters want to spend time on a farm. Baby Chick loves horses. We have looked for a farmstead to take them to where they could have a farm life experience that didn’t center around the tourist trade and getting in didn’t cost an arm and a leg. We decided to pull the motorcycle out and ride to Prophetstown State Park.

It’s a good idea to start a motorcycle adventure with a good breakfast. Cracker Barrel always has a good meal waiting for the traveler.

What’s the deal with the farm at Prophetstown?

The state park in Central, Indiana is the site where Tenskwatawa and the Shawnee camped. The Battle Ground where the battle between the Shawnee and William Henry Harrison lies a little way down the road from the state park. Tecumseh went south to persuade other native people to join the pan-Indiana confederation to stop European movement into the territories. Tenskwatawa provided the religious fervor needed to inspire the people. He became known as The Prophet. The brothers agreed not to provoke Harrison while Tecumseh was away, but Tenskwatawa went against the agreement. The resulting battle put an end to Native American union and the removal of the remaining native people to beyond the Mississippi.

Dark clouds hovered overhead on our ride to the farm at Prophetstown. We had a great ride. The GPS took us on a strange course through the city of Lafayette, which seemed to be miles out of our way. The device must have been attempting to avoid road construction. Pretty pink cone flowers greated us at the state parks front gate. We noticed the big red barn and farm house off in the distance.

We had to travel on a gravel road to get to the farmstead. Bikers and gravel roads don’t mix well.

Sensory overload at the farm at Prophetstown

There is a lot to experience on a visit to the working farm at Prophetstown State Park. The city smells of engine exhaust are replace with horse and cow manure. The smell isn’t heavy, but it is there. The sounds are different on the farm. Roosters crow and horses have their own language. The music playing in the front yard of the Gibson House drew our attention assoon as we dismounted from the bike.

One persistent hen wanted to join in the music making.

All of the chickens ran around the farm free range. They seemed to enjoy being around the people.

The farm had a mature rooster who enjoyed his flock of hens..

A little rooster that didn’t know his way around the ladies yet but could make a lot of noise.

We saw horses in the field.

The seemed to be enjoying the day going about their horse business in the field.

Horse and buggy ride at the farm at Prophetstown

People could pay a little extra money and take a horse and buggy ride and tour the state park.

These beautiful working horses became an invitiation to fun.

We saw cows

and pigs.

The Gibson house at the Farm at Prophetstown

You could see the difference in the class structure in farm life in Indiana in the 1920’s. The farmhouse appeared much larger than the tenants house next door. The furnishings more lavish and comfortable. Rooster and i noticed the Batwing typewriter sitting on a small table.

The Tenants house appeared to be the place where a lot of the work got done around the farm. It was smallerand there was evidence children lived under this roof.

We took the long way home from the Farm at Prophetstown

We decided to take the back roads home and rode through a forest and crossed Adam’s mill covered Bridge before gliding past the Mill. Dark clouds gathered in the sky above us., making the worry about a storm made us consider cutting the ride short.

In conclusion, Rooster and I had a great day at the Farm at Prophetstown. It was an inexpensive way to spend the afternoon exploring farm life. The cost was eight dollars, which is the standard admission into an Indiana State Park for residents. We plan to take the Bossy Posse to this location the next time they spend the day with us. This farmstead is a great way to learn about sustainable agriculture and homesteading.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

8 thoughts on “The Farm at Prophetstown

  1. Not that I’ve traveled Indiana extensively, but I did not know about the park or the farm there. And so I very much appreciate your narrative and review. I hope the posse has a grand time visiting there.

  2. I googled ” Shawnee and William Henry Harrison” and comes back with “Tecumseh’s War” from Wikipedia. And there’s a tribe named Miami? Isn’t that interesting? I thought this Miami tribe should be located in Florida.

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Day 172 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 172 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 172 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 172 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful we have air conditioning. An early summer heat wave descended on our neck of the woods. Walking outside felt like stepping into a sauna. We managed to make it to the nice air-conditioned gym to get out steps in for the day. A storm moved in our direction and cooled things off, and we expect a repeat performance tomorrow and the next day. I am grateful for the air conditioning spaces today

This old lady doesn’t like to sweat.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 172 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

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A Crucible Image

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called A Crucible Image.  

About the Black Out Poem and A Crucible Image

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

A Crucible Image

Rules of the situation
An overt action
He became suspicious
“Perhaps, an explanation.”
A romantic fool
Totally boneless
Unconvinced
It would endure
The monochrome photograph
Here she was
The beautiful shadow
Smiled
Twenty-four years ago
A crucible image
Rooted in love indomitable
Exceptional
Remembering 
That cursed thing
Will be expecting the time
Left to form
Snapped
Could stretch it
Bumptiously bad

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Day 171 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 171 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 171 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 171 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful that we missed running over every member of the raccoon family that darted into the street in front of us. I don’t know why this gang of raccoons decided to run across the street. Rooster counted six of them, all running in the same direction in front of our car. I figure they were on their way to loot and pillage the trash cans in the neighborhood on our left. He slammed on the breaks to avoid hitting them. Thanks to Rooster’s quick thinking, I am grateful that not a single raccoon life was lost.

This old lady is concerned about raccoon safety.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

A Verdict
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 175 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Bitchy Slant
I plan to use Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of …
Day 174 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 171 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

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