Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender

I’ve never been good about keeping a journal. It all boils down to consistency. There are days when I skip making an entry. Life can crowd out the time I need to write down my thoughts about a day’s events. I’ve also been reluctant to pose as an expert on the writing process. If I knew anything of value about writing, my work would already be in print. I went out on a skinny limb of a tall in 2022 when I shared my 365 days of thankfulness. The exercise forced me to put myself out there with my soft belly exposed. Thank you for joining me on my journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a journal in 2023 to document my progress. I will call Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender.

Note: I consider editing an important part of the writing process. Editing is where all the artistry happens.

My morning writing before I started Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender

I struggled through writing a chapter of Amazing Buchanan and the Beast this morning. It took a while to switch voices. This chapter was told in the first person from Chad Wallace’s point of view. I had to switch to a more professional voice. I don’t think I will stick to the outline I made yesterday. An additional chapter needs to be added to enhance the plot. Will arranges for a sting operation on Harold Percival to persuade him to sell his stock and resign from the board of directors of Chandler Enterprises.

I have an idea for another Cascade Poem I will work on this afternoon.

The book I am currently reading right now and Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender

I read the Salinger short story Just Before The War With The Eskimos. Nobody goes to war with the Eskimos, so the title is slightly deceptive. I enjoyed the story. It focuses on two young prep school girls. Gennie is frustrated because she always has to pay for the cab ride home. They go to Selena’s house for money, where Gennie is waiting for Selena to get her some money. She meets Selena’s older brother, who is 4F from the army because of a heart condition. I’ve heard Salinger meant for him to be a Christ figure, but maybe all Salinger meant for him to be a guy with a heart condition. Gennie does make a transition by the end of the story.

What I’m listening to right now and Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender

I listened to the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, The Commitments. This movie focused on a fictional Irish rhythm and blues band that fell apart when they were on the verge of success. Rooster and I enjoyed this movie, so we bought the soundtrack.

The thing I am most thankful for at this moment.

I am thankful I am perfecting a sugarless chocolate chip cookie recipe I am currently experimenting with to achieve a moister cookie. I added another egg and melted the chocolate chips in the microwave until they were softer but not a chocolate goo. The cookies I pulled out of the oven tasted fantastic.

This old lady says

Sometimes you need to break that third egg to reach perfection. Sometimes making a great discovery or achieving something extraordinary amounts to persistence. You must take one more step in the right direction to get where you should be. Never give up. Never surrender,

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …
Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …

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Considering

Udit Bhatia invented cascade poetry in 2007. This relatively new style of poetry got its name because it should flow down the page in a waterfall effect. The poem’s structure is simple and relies on the refrain to create the cascading rhythm. The magic of these poems centers around the refrain. The unmetered poems vary in theme depending on the poet’s desire. The only rule used when writing a cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are repeated at the ends of every stanza that follows. I will call this cascade poem Considering.

Structure of a cascade poem and Considering

The lines are represented as ABC.

  1. The first line ends with line A.
  2. The second line ends with Line B.
  3. The third line ends with line C.

I had written this form of poetry before and had fun with it. I plan to start the month of March using this style. The length of the stanza can vary. There is no rule about sticking to three lines. The thing to remember is that the longer the stanza, the more complicated the poem.

Considering 

If I had a magical crystal ball 
And could travel back to my past.
What would I eliminate or change?
What would I leave the same?

Would I be tempted at all
To complicate my fate?
Would I delete a moment,
If I had a magical crystal ball?

Some events were made to last.
Some could possibly be rearranged.
With a wand made of wishes 
And could travel back to my past.

Would you think it strange
If I put my eraser away
When you think about it
What would I eliminate or change?

I might be a little to blame 
When it comes to creative thinking
And I brush the idea aside without blinking.
What would I leave the same?



Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …
Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …

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Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side

I’ve never been good about keeping a journal. It all boils down to consistency. There are days when I skip making an entry. Life can crowd out the time I need to write down my thoughts about a day’s events. I’ve also been reluctant to pose as an expert on the writing process. If I knew anything of value about writing, my work would already be in print. I went out on a skinny limb of a tall in 2022 when I shared my 365 days of thankfulness. The exercise forced me to put myself out there with my soft belly exposed. Thank you for joining me on my journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a journal in 2023 to document my progress. I will call Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side.

Note: I consider editing an important part of the writing process. Editing is where all the artistry happens.

My morning writing before I started Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side.

Spent the morning doing an outline that takes me to the last chapter of Amazing Buchanan and the Beast. The ending will take me to the same place it ended in the first draft. I am finding these outlines helpful. The rewrite will be finished by the end of the month.

I got my poetry grove on and wrote a couple of Cascade poems today. I liked the second one I wrote. The jury is still out on the first one.

The book I am currently reading right now and Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side

I read the second short story in Nine Stories by J.D. Salinger today. The story was titled “Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut.” He sold this short story to Hollywood. The movie My Foolish Heart won Susan Haywood an Oscar nomination. Salinger didn’t like the movie. The short story deals with lost love and a child with imaginary friends.

What I’m listening to right now and Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side

As I write this blog post, I am listening to Melissa Etheridge’s The Road Less Traveled.

The thing I am most thankful for at this moment.

I am thankful today that the snow that fell from the sky didn’t stay on the ground long. Our warm temperature here in Indiana caused it to melt. The scarce snow this year hasn’t disappointed me at all.

This old lady says

I am so happy we didn’t have to take the snow shovel out of storage. I know we need the snow to increase the table of groundwater that helps the crops grow, but I hate the white stuff. We here in our part of Indiana have had great weather this year.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …
Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …

2 thoughts on “Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side

  1. Journaling can be a wonderful and insightful process, Molly. I enjoy editing too. First drafts are stressful, so I agree with you that it’s in the editing where the magic happens. Enjoy the arrival of spring and I’m glad you’re done with the snow. 🙂

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Settling For Funky

Udit Bhatia invented cascade poetry in 2007. This relatively new style of poetry got its name because it should flow down the page in a waterfall effect. The poem’s structure is simple and relies on the refrain to create the cascading rhythm. The magic of these poems centers around the refrain. The unmetered poems vary in theme depending on the poet’s desire. The only rule used when writing a cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are repeated at the ends of every stanza that follows. I will call this cascade poem Settling For Funky.

Structure of a cascade poem and Settling For Funky

The lines are represented as ABC.

  1. The first line ends with line A.
  2. The second line ends with Line B.
  3. The third line ends with line C.

I had written this form of poetry before and had fun with it. I plan to start the month of March using this style. The length of the stanza can vary. There is no rule about sticking to three lines. The thing to remember is that the longer the stanza, the more complicated the poem.

 Settling For Funky

Stuck waiting there in the dry, soft spot
I search my memory for the right words
And I always wanted to be Emily Dickinson
But I guess I’d settle for being more funky.

It all comes down to the slick idea I bought
Back when I was a poor kid with big dreams
Typing into the night and my mama’s screams
Stuck waiting there in the dry, soft spot.

Ideas are as cheap as fluttering birds,
Fluttering wings take me away from here
Between these walls of longing and fear
I search my memory for the right words

So many reasons I didn’t mention
Made me want to cry
The thing is I had to try
And I always wanted to be Emily Dickinson

Now my rhythms sound clumsy and clunky
While I sit at another kitchen table
And write the only thing that I am able
But I guess I’d settle for being more funky.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …

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Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry

I’ve never been good about keeping a journal. It all boils down to consistency. There are days when I skip making an entry. Life can crowd out the time I need to write down my thoughts about a day’s events. I’ve also been reluctant to pose as an expert on the writing process. If I knew anything of value about writing, my work would already be in print. I went out on a skinny limb of a tall in 2022 when I shared my 365 days of thankfulness. The exercise forced me to put myself out there with my soft belly exposed. Thank you for joining me on my journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a journal in 2023 to document my progress. I will call Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry.

Note: I consider editing an important part of the writing process. Editing is where all the artistry happens.

My morning writing before I started Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry

I finished another chapter of Amazing Buchanan and the Beast and enjoyed my morning pages. This chapter had a lot of action. It starts slow and heats up. Amazing gets caught by Melvin Samples, and Will rescues her when he is in the form of the beast. I am getting near the end of the book. The direction of this story has taken some twists and turns. I should write an outline for the book’s ending because I’ve moved past the previous one.

I did write a Cascade Poem today. It’s not my best, but at least I wrote something. Any movement in the creative poetic direction is better than stagnation. Water that doesn’t move grows a thick layer of green algae that can poison the fish.

The book I am currently reading right now and Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry

I read the first short story in Nine Stories by J.D. Salinger today. “A Perfect Day for Bananafish,” one of Salinger’s first short stories published in The New Yorker, started this collection of short stories. It dealt with Seymour, one of the fictional characters of the Glass family we met in Franny and Zooey. This story reveals Seymour’s suicide. He came back from the military displaying a series of self-destructive behaviors. Salinger served in WWII and suffered from PTSD.

I like the way Salinger recycles the characters from the Glass family. I did the same with my characters from The Henhouse Series when I wrote my short stories for NaNoWriMo years ago. You shouldn’t throw away a cast of good characters once you’ve created them.

What I’m listening to right now and Entry 81: The Well is Still Dry, but life Must go on

I am listening to The Avertt Brothers I and Love and You. I love this group’s bluegrass mixed with a touch of rock-n-roll sound.

The thing I am most thankful for at this moment.

I am thankful I managed to write one poem today. The well might still be dry, but life goes on. The world won’t stop if I don’t write another poem.

This old lady says

Sometimes a person has it, and other times they don’t. Rooster says maybe it’s time for me to stop writing poems for a while. He claims I’ve had a pretty good run writing my poetry. The thing is, I am not a quitter, so I plan to write through the drought. The only way forward is through the thick pound of ideas.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

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Not for Wimps

Udit Bhatia invented cascade poetry in 2007. This relatively new style of poetry got its name because it should flow down the page in a waterfall effect. The poem’s structure is simple and relies on the refrain to create the cascading rhythm. The magic of these poems centers around the refrain. The unmetered poems vary in theme depending on the poet’s desire. The only rule used when writing a cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are repeated at the ends of every stanza that follows. I will call this cascade poem Not for Wimps.

Structure of a cascade poem and Not for Wimps

The lines are represented as ABC.

  1. The first line ends with line A.
  2. The second line ends with Line B.
  3. The third line ends with line C.

I had written this form of poetry before and had fun with it. I plan to start the month of March using this style. The length of the stanza can vary. There is no rule about sticking to three lines. The thing to remember is that the longer the stanza, the more complicated the poem.

Not for Wimps

Old age isn’t for wimps,
Or so I heard it said.
There is only one thing I know for sure
But none of us are going, 
To make it out of here alive 

Yes, we all walk with limps.
It’s because of the bad knees
There was a day when we rambled
Like we were walking on a breeze
Old age isn’t for wimps.

Old is better than dead
The only two options with age
The Grim Reaper will turn the page
Geriatric is a catching disease,
Or so I heard it said.

I’ve searched, but there is no cure
For the passing of time
And I don’t think it’s such a crime
For me to creep, crack, and sneeze
There is only one thing I know for sure.

The young they never see it coming
Believing they have eternal youth
There is one simple truth 
The wind will blow, and old bones freeze
But none of us are going. 

We tell ourselves lies to survive
It’s easier not to know
Because anxiety would grow
And a young heart would attempt,
To make it out of here alive 

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

One thought on “Not for Wimps

  1. Nah, I know I’m getting older, but age is much better than dying and never amounting or having the best days of life be in my youth. I hope I age with grace and maturity and still have a life and enjoy it and not worry about beauty or anything else.

    I literally just hope I don’t feel bad for being old when I get old because everyone I know hates it and I don’t want to hate it. I want to enjoy it.

    I’m not enjoying youth right now and a lot of older people (some not even past 60) make me dread my life or make me feel bad for existing.

    I tend to think that not everyone finds old people ugly, useless, or embarrassing. I don’t. I can’t be the only one in the world, yet when I say my opinion, especially to older people, they just say wait until I get older.

    I’ve never been beautiful, perfectly able-bodied, thin, and worth talking to. I’m average, kind of boring, and tall and nobody misses out of me. I don’t think I’d lose anything. If I am only special or worthy if I’m youthful, then why have humans value long age and staying alive if they hate themselves for the rest of their life for one gray hair or droopy skin. Shouldn’t we just have kids (if we want) then die at thirty or forty because some people throw a hissy fit when they’re older than that? (Not talking about you, but my peers.)

    Like dang, is it that bad? Is it awful? Is it even worth living?

    I’m already mildly neglected from my peers so when I gain extra years, am I just going to dissolve into nothingness?

    My mom, who also laments her old age, says that I gotta find the right people to be around but I’ve yet to find one person who isn’t like that and trying to stay youthful psychologically and physically or an older person who’s angry because they’re older and have to say they admire children’s ignorance or whatever (when they don’t) or whatever young thing I can’t think about it.

    I don’t know. It’s like I’m stuck.

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Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time

I’ve never been good about keeping a journal. It all boils down to consistency. There are days when I skip making an entry. Life can crowd out the time I need to write down my thoughts about a day’s events. I’ve also been reluctant to pose as an expert on the writing process. If I knew anything of value about writing, my work would already be in print. I went out on a skinny limb of a tall in 2022 when I shared my 365 days of thankfulness. The exercise forced me to put myself out there with my soft belly exposed. Thank you for joining me on my journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a journal in 2023 to document my progress. I will call Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time.

Note: I consider editing an important part of the writing process. Editing is where all the artistry happens.

My morning writing before I started Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time.

I finished the chapter I was working on yesterday of Amazing Buchanan and the Beast. The story is progressing better now that I deleted the last half of the book I wrote during NaNoWriMo. Everywhere I turn, the theme of life on a houseboat pops before me. That is where I decided Amazing would hide from Melvin Samples. It seemed like the perfect location because the story takes place near a bayou in Louisiana.
I will focus on writing poetry for the rest of the afternoon. Poetic creativity is such an elusive monster. It will hide from you. Ideas run through my mind but evaporate when I sit at my computer.

The book I am currently reading right now and Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time

I took the day off from reading, but I will have my nose stuck in a book tomorrow. It takes a day for me to digest the book I finished reading.

What I’m listening to right now and Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time

I am listening to The Head and the Heart today to get inspired. Rooster has his cool jazz playing in the background. It’s the style of music he is into at the moment. I listened to The Head and the Heart. Then I took my headset off for a round of cool jazz.

The thing I am most thankful for at this moment.

I am thankful that this day is almost over. I have been dragging since the time change. Springing forward in the spring wears me out.

This old lady says

I am an old lady, and I need my sleep. What idiot came up with the daylight savings idea? I hear it had something to do with the railroad. Well, I don’t work for the railroad. They can stay away from my alarm clock until they cut me a check—daylight savings time. Have you ever heard of anything so ridiculous? The sun comes up in the morning when it wants to and goes to bed at night when it pleases. Just like poetic creativity, you can’t control the sun.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

4 thoughts on “Entry 80: Still Suffering from Daylight Savings Time

  1. Feeling ya on the reset that is springtime and how tiring it is in the moment! Love this line too: “Just like poetic creativity, you can’t control the sun.” Beautifully true! <3

  2. I think you’re an amazing writer. There’s plenty of amazing writers out there that don’t have their work on print, and for the most part, I feel something reading your content that makes me stay followed.

    And I don’t know why DST is a thing, but if we didn’t have it, I guess we would just have the same schedule as spring forward. I kinda don’t mind DST, but it’s probably because I don’t drive. It takes getting used to, but I don’t mind.

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A Man About Town

Udit Bhatia invented cascade poetry in 2007. This relatively new style of poetry got its name because it should flow down the page in a waterfall effect. The poem’s structure is simple and relies on the refrain to create the cascading rhythm. The magic of these poems centers around the refrain. The unmetered poems vary in theme depending on the poet’s desire. The only rule used when writing a cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are repeated at the ends of every stanza that follows. I will call this cascade poem A Man About Town.

Structure of a cascade poem and A Man About Town

The lines are represented as ABC.

  1. The first line ends with line A.
  2. The second line ends with Line B.
  3. The third line ends with line C.

I had written this form of poetry before and had fun with it. I plan to start the month of March using this style. The length of the stanza can vary. There is no rule about sticking to three lines. The thing to remember is that the longer the stanza, the more complicated the poem.

A Man About Town

Such a lair and a man about town
But he had no inspiration to ease his mind.
There was a better dream waiting for him
Somewhere down a winding, crooked road.

Hanging around here would only bring him down
He had so many more important things to do
Then to be left behind and play the clown 
Such a lair and a man about town

So many adventures left for him to find
Beyond this place with an unsettling view
Where people could be cold and unkind
But he had no inspiration to ease his mind.

All his possibilities looked exceptionally dim.
Tongues wagged, and rumors flew.
When staying put looked extremely grim.
There was a better dream waiting for him.

It’s never a good idea to carry a load
Of responsibilities that belong to you.
Dreams are waiting out in the distant cold
Somewhere down a winding, crooked road.


Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

Leave a Reply

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Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off

I’ve never been good about keeping a journal. It all boils down to consistency. There are days when I skip making an entry. Life can crowd out the time I need to write down my thoughts about a day’s events. I’ve also been reluctant to pose as an expert on the writing process. If I knew anything of value about writing, my work would already be in print. I went out on a skinny limb of a tall in 2022 when I shared my 365 days of thankfulness. The exercise forced me to put myself out there with my soft belly exposed. Thank you for joining me on my journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a journal in 2023 to document my progress. I will call Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off.

Note: I consider editing an important part of the writing process. Editing is where all the artistry happens.

My morning writing before I started Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off

I started working on Amazing Buchanan and the Beast this morning. I didn’t get through the rewrite because I made the mistake of opening Saving the Henhouse to discover Grammarly thought I made over 600 errors that mainly concerned my word choices. I’ll admit that I have developed the bad habit of being wordy and using certain phrases when I write. That meant I spent a considerable amount of time going through each of the mistakes and making corrections.

The book I am currently reading right now and Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off

I finished J.D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey today. The problem with reading someone like Salinger is the realization that you will never measure up to that literary standard. He took a simple family scene and made it interesting. I plan to read Nine Stories by J.D. Salinger next.

What I’m listening to right now and Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off

I listened to Ani DiFranco today. I am not one of her biggest fans, but I enjoy how she speaks the lyrics of the poems she writes with her music. At this point, I will take any form of inspiration.

The thing I am most thankful for at this moment.

I am thankful we took the afternoon off and went to Fire on the Monon for one of their tenderloins.

This old lady says

Sometimes all a girl needs is a break to recharge her batteries. A day off  plus a pile of money and a room of my own would work wonders.  

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

6 thoughts on “Entry 79: Taking the Afternoon Off

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Suburban Lanes

Udit Bhatia invented cascade poetry in 2007. This relatively new style of poetry got its name because it should flow down the page in a waterfall effect. The poem’s structure is simple and relies on the refrain to create the cascading rhythm. The magic of these poems centers around the refrain. The unmetered poems vary in theme depending on the poet’s desire. The only rule used when writing a cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are repeated at the ends of every stanza that follows. I will call this cascade poem Suburban Lanes.

Structure of a cascade poem and Suburban Lanes

The lines are represented as ABC.

  1. The first line ends with line A.
  2. The second line ends with Line B.
  3. The third line ends with line C.

I had written this form of poetry before and had fun with it. I plan to start the month of March using this style. The length of the stanza can vary. There is no rule about sticking to three lines. The thing to remember is that the longer the stanza, the more complicated the poem.

Suburban Lanes

Take a night trip into the country.
Drive a couple of miles down the road
Watch close or you will miss the place
And roll right past the Suburban Lanes

The exterior is a little bit dumpy
And the parking lot might be bumpy
But it’s the best bowling alley for miles
Take a night trip into the country.

The trip is rough when it’s snowed
To hear heavy balls rolling down a wooden alley
And see flashing scoreboards tracking the tally
Drive a couple of miles down the road.

Gutter balls disappear without a trace
Strikes aren’t ever that common
If you are lucky, you will pick up a spare.
Watch close, or you will miss the place

Some lose their marbles; others have some brains.
Some stay sober, and others drink beer.
At least you know all the people here,
And roll right past the Suburban Lanes

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Entry 83: Never Give up And Never Surrender
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Considering
A cascade is that all the lines in the first paragraph are …
Entry 82: Writing Myself to the Other Side
My journey in the written word. Therefore, I plan to keep a …
Settling For Funky
All the first paragraph's lines are repeated at the ends of every …

3 thoughts on “Suburban Lanes

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