Insecure

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to write this form of poetry. I ran out of pages in Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell. I decided to step things up in my adventure with black-out poetry.

Before I retired, I worked in a small university police office. Part of my duties centered around processing the lost and found. At the end of each semester, students often left books on table tops they couldn’t sell back to the bookstore. We kept them for a long time before placing them in the trash. I brought Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset home because it caught my attention. This poem I created from my rescued book is titled Insecure.

About the Black Out Poem and Insecure

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I’m excited to see how the different textbook writing style found in Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset translates into poetic form.

Insecure

Emotional
Great anxiety
Last and alone
A complicated world
Creating or imagining
Win acceptance
Some security and hope
Competent, strong, good
Self
The person’s senses
Are validating
Ask people
You can imagine
Your route to self-esteem
Not easy to replace
Challenge, struggle, criticism, setbacks
Acutely aware
Unsettled
At the end of
A good day
Stopped keeping track
Insecure victories
Taking more risks
To leave gracefully
Internal monologue
Some pretty strong things 

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

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Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedies in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward positive change. Being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 280 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 280 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful the effects of the migraine I had this morning lasted only an hour. I’m not typically a migraine sufferer, but about ten years ago, I had one that caused my vision to narrow and become so blurry I couldn’t see. We called the ER because, as I said, I’m not typically a migraine sufferer. They advised me to come in because there was a possibility I was about to have a stroke. To make a long story short, after many tests and a night in the hospital, it was determined I’d had a migraine. I had one of those this morning. After I sat in a dark room, the strange vision disappeared in a couple of hours. The headache hung around for a while. These random experiences gave me great sympathy for people that suffer from migraines. I wish medical science would find a quick cure. Having a migraines all the time would be a terrible experience. My heart goes out to the people who have them regularly. I am grateful my migraine didn’t last very long.

This old lady is happy her eyes can see again.

I have learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Leave a Reply

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In Vivid Detail

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to write this form of poetry. I ran out of pages in Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell. I decided to step things up in my adventure with black-out poetry.

Before I retired, I worked in a small university police office. Part of my duties centered around processing the lost and found. At the end of each semester, students often left books on table tops they couldn’t sell back to the bookstore. We kept them for a long time before placing them in the trash. I brought Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset home because it caught my attention. This poem I created from my rescued book is titled In Vivid Detail.

About the Black Out Poem and In Vivid Detail

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I’m excited to see how the different textbook writing style found in Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset translates into poetic form.

In Vivid Detail

“I’ll do it tomorrow.”
Shows that vowing
Intense vowing
Is often useless
A vivid concrete plan
Get up
Brush my teeth
Start writing
Talk about something
Think of something
Do something
Plan how
Will you do it
In vivid detail
When, where, and how
Do something
Visualize
Carry it out
Feeling bad
Doing good
Let’s go back
Your attempt
Can feel miserable
Plan to deal with it
Loss, failure, or rejection

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “In Vivid Detail

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedies in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward positive change. Being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 279 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 279 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful for my Instant Pot. I heard so many horror stories about using a pressure cooker when I was a kid. The old-fashioned models had a bad habit of exploding. People got burnt, and holes were put in many ceilings. It took six months after we bought our first Instant Pot to work up the nerve to plug the thing in and use it to make a meal. Rooster dropped our first one, which required us to replace it. This modern pressure cooker version has made making meals so much easier. I put a frozen roast in an hour ago, and it came out perfect. I am grateful I plugged the thing in and gave it a try.

This old lady likes her modern pressure cooker.

I have learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedies in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward positive change. Being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 278 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness

On day 278 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful to be through the first edit of Chicks Gone Wild. My goal was to review the book once before NaNoWriMo started on November 1st. I always participate in this writing marathon. I always found it to be a creative adventure. I started the editing process earlier this year but put it aside when I got an idea for a book. I have learned much about the writing process over the past eight years. I used to dread the editing process. I now know that editing is where artistry takes place. It’s where the plot gets defined, and mistakes are corrected. I won’t fool myself. Chicks gone Wild still isn’t perfect, but it is better than it was when I started. I am grateful to have taken the journey through this book again.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 278 of my 365 Days of thankfulness

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

On Our Terms

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to write this form of poetry. I ran out of pages in Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell. I decided to step things up in my adventure with black-out poetry.

Before I retired, I worked in a small university police office. Part of my duties centered around processing the lost and found. At the end of each semester, students often left books on table tops they couldn’t sell back to the bookstore. We kept them for a long time before placing them in the trash. I brought Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset home because it caught my attention. This poem I created from my rescued book is titled  On Our Terms.

About the Black Out Poem and On Our Terms

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I’m excited to see how the different textbook writing style found in Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset translates into poetic form.

On Our Terms
Wanting
In the worst way
We don’t care
We will love
At the last moment
Would not let go
It was hard
It didn’t matter
We love you
On our terms
It’s not just 
Judging you
Love and respect
Aspirations
I often feel
I am not successful
Deep down
Judgmental
Everything
Black-and-white

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

4 thoughts on “On Our Terms

  1. I appreciate the strength of feeling, the conviction, in your poem. Funny, I wrote about terms today in the same way. I hope you and yours are really well.

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Day 277 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedies in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward positive change. Being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 277 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 277 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 277 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful that my numbers were good during my six-month doctor’s visit. My A1C is 5.9, much better than it was when we started our diet and walking routine. I am bragging, but I am happy that I am getting healthier. This experience has taught me that the little things we do to improve ourselves ultimately add a lot to our quality of life. I believe everyone can take steps to improve their life. The weird things that have happened over the past couple of years with the virus and the lockdown taught me to take control of my fitness. Big pharma and the healthcare system don’t have all the answers. Most of the time, they don’t want to teach you how to get well. They only want to prescribe another pill. I am grateful I learned to take control of my health.

This old Lady is getting healthy.

I have learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

What Does it Mean?

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to write this form of poetry. I ran out of pages in Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell. I decided to step things up in my adventure with black-out poetry.

Before I retired, I worked in a small university police office. Part of my duties centered around processing the lost and found. At the end of each semester, students often left books on table tops they couldn’t sell back to the bookstore. We kept them for a long time before placing them in the trash. I brought Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset home because it caught my attention. This poem I created from my rescued book is titled What Does it Mean?

About the Black Out Poem and What Does it Mean?

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I’m excited to see how the different textbook writing style found in Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset translates into poetic form.

What Does it Mean?
Less and less
Mad at the system
You don’t take control
What else could you have done?
Not a work
A finished product
Protect themselves
Everything but take charge
What does it mean?
In our society
It’s hard to come to grips
Filling a role
Tactically and strategically
I believe I could have
That ability
Works against the story
By far the most exciting
Won the lottery
Had a chance to do it all
The power forward

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “What Does it Mean?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Day 276 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedies in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward positive change. Being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in June? This post covers day 276 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 276 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 276 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am glad I learned how to sweat. I used to walk during my lunch hour at work before I retired, but I never walked hard enough to sweat. Working out at the gym has shown me a new level of fitness. I manage to sweat every day, discovering that perspiration is a good thing. I am grateful to be a golden oldie who learned how to sweat.

This old lady can sweat.

I have learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things before your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world always falls apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Failure

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to write this form of poetry. I ran out of pages in Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell. I decided to step things up in my adventure with black-out poetry.

Before I retired, I worked in a small university police office. Part of my duties centered around processing the lost and found. At the end of each semester, students often left books on table tops they couldn’t sell back to the bookstore. We kept them for a long time before placing them in the trash. I brought Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset home because it caught my attention. This poem I created from my rescued book is titled Failure.

About the Black Out Poem and Failure

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a book page, or written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I’m excited to see how the different textbook writing style found in Carol S. Dweck’s Mindset translates into poetic form.

Failure
After 
Disappointed
The previous year
I squeezed
I hung in there
Sometimes
You get
Satisfaction
When things aren’t completely perfect
When to be the best
You give everything
You will always 
Fall in love
Establish superiority
Worthier than the nobodies
I’ll admit it
Effort and personal best
Some people perform
Remember
Effort is not a cause for pride
What is failure?
Setbacks
They’re a wake-up call
Try to coast
Physically and mentally prepared

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Insecure
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 280 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
In Vivid Detail
I brought Carol S. Dweck's Mindset home because it caught my attention. …
Day 279 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Failure

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This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.