The Large Garden

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called The Large Garden.

About the Black Out Poem and The Large Garden

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a page from a book, or any written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell byRebecca Hunt to create these poems.

The Large Garden

Quiet and argumentative
A serrated glare
Out of earshot
His fingers retracted
The gravitational field of instinct
A friendly bump
Remembering
The large garden
With the wild border
A bed
Of flowering bushes
An old kneeling apple tree
“If I’m completely honest
I wanted to tell you before.”
A hostile force coming for her,
“So do it with haste.”

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Hideous Place
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …

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Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change, and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in May? This post covers day 142 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 142 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful for the wind changing directions. A spring storm moved out of the west with thunder and lightning. The wind was ferocious. I glanced out my back window and noticed it blew the large umbrella over in the middle of the table we have outside. I dreaded going out to deal with it because the storm still raged. I pictured myself being struck by lightning as I tried to take the large metal rod out of the middle of the table. I was about to walk out the back door when the wind changed directions. The metal rod holding the umbrella moved upright, taking the table with it. It was as if it hadn’t been blown over at all. I decided to leave well enough alone and watch television until the power went out. I am grateful I didn’t have to go out into the storm.

This old woman rode out the storm.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek the light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things right in front of your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world is always falling apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
A Hideous Place
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 141 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
The Organ Grinder Monkey
Add lines to the poem longer. Thus, you are making a cascading …

One thought on “Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

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A Hideous Place

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called A Hideous Place

About the Black Out Poem and A Hideous Place

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a page from a book, or any written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

A Hideous Place

Indignant at the pressure
To force him.
More enamored
Escaped hurried efforts
And then a short period
Inactivity occurred
Pleaded with
A foul frazzled rasp
Eyes were turned aside.
Him studying her
“Why do you always talk
Such rubbish?”
A wide grin
With his jaws
His dirt and pungency
A hideous place
Analyse the texture
The manners of an animal
A triumphant expression. 


Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “A Hideous Place

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Day 141 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in May? This post covers day 141 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 141 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 141 of my 365 days of thankfulness, I am grateful I started writing a new story. I’ve been coasting for the past two years. During NaNoWriMo, I managed to develop a story based on the Beauty and the Beast fairytale. I didn’t even have the story until the end of October. I wrote the book, but then my romance with the story ended. The past two years filled with an endless editing stream zapped my energy. A story came to me. I started typing it last week. The best part about the project will be that some of my NaNoWriMo characters will make brief appearances. I am grateful to be doing the first draft of another story.

Still thankful.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things right in front of your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world is always falling apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

4 thoughts on “Day 141 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

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The Organ Grinder Monkey

I ripped another page from the calendar hanging on my kitchen wall. We enter the month of May with thoughts of Spring swimming around in our heads. The sun is shining bright on the days it isn’t raining. The snow vanished into distant memory. This month I plan to explore a poetry style that reminds me of a trickling waterfall. Udit Bhatia created the Cascade poem. There are no rules for rhythm or meter. The layout is simple in that the lines of the first stanza are repeated as the refrain lines in the stanzas that follow. The poem flows like this ABC, xxA, xxB xxC. Add lines to the poem longer. Thus, you are making a cascading effect with words. How hard can that be? This Cascade Poem I titled The Organ Grinder Monkey.

Note: I will also be adding Black Out Poems as we go along the way. I plan to keep using this style until the book I’m using runs out of pages for me to play with to create these unique and visual poems. I might as well get started. I’m excited about jogging down this road.

The Organ Grinder Monkey

The Organ Grinder Monkey

I forgot about the organ grinder monkey
Before the ferocious bitter bite on the hand
Teeth and the stitches leaving a purple scar
The experience happened so long ago
Her distant memory surfaced out of thin air

A question on a blog post was the key
If you want to fully understand
Rooster and I were young and stupid
We needed years to truly grow
I forgot about the organ grinder monkey

The trade was unpredicted and unplanned
The suggestion was trifling and bazaar
Rooster thought he was making a great deal
But there were a few things he didn’t know
 Before the ferocious bitter bite on the hand

He brought the primate home in the car
Missy from the first considered me a foe
It was due to my black hair, you see
Her former family gave her a scare
Teeth and stitches leaving a purple scar

She sat down friendly just for show
She cocked her head a pet to demand
Once I had let down my realistic guard
Teeth plunged into my flesh, hard
The experience happened so long ago

The injury created a deep tear
And red blood began to flow
We could no longer live in harmony
The organ grinder monkey had to go
Her distant memory surfaced out of thin air


Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

3 thoughts on “The Organ Grinder Monkey

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Day 140 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in May? This post covers day 140 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 140 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 140 of my 356 days of thankfulness, I am grateful Rooster figured out how to change his printer toner. He struggled with it for a long time until he took my suggestion and watched a U-Tube video. I could have figured it out pretty fast because I used to change the toner and the large ones at work. There was no way I wanted to get in the middle of my husband’s fight with the machine. In my 48 years of marriage, I have learned it is best not to participate in such quarrels. It took three minutes for him to make the change once he discovered the toner company had placed the directions to a different machine in the box. I am grateful he is now happily printing all the copies he needs.

This old lady is still counting her blessings.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things right in front of your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world is always falling apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …
A Hideous Place
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 141 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 140 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

  1. “It took three minutes for him to make the change once he discovered the toner company had placed the directions to a different machine in the box.”

    *facepalm*

    Ooops!! LOL

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A  Lullaby to Him

I have a confession to make. The Black Out Poem has captured my imagination. I find it interesting to take a page filled with writing and turn it into something often contrary to the original meaning. It’s like playing with someone else’s words and making them become my own. Free verse is the best way to work with this form of poetry. There are many pages of the book I selected left. I’m going by the old cliché “waste not, want not.” I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt’s Mr. Chartwell until it runs out of words to create Black Out verses. The poem I called A  Lullaby to Him.

About the Black Out Poem and A  Lullaby to Him

Poet takes a black marker and redacts words until a poem is formed. It is important to note the text and redacted words form a visual poem.

Method to use

1. Identify source text. The source can be a newspaper, a page from a book, or any written text.

2. Draw a box around keywords or phrases.

3. Make Connections between boxes. (This is optional.)

4. Color the rest in with a marker. You can use any color. The most common color used is black.

I found this style of creating a poem unique from anything I’ve ever tried before. The words are already provided, and the challenge is to make something poetic out of the text. I decided to use Mr. Chartwell by Rebecca Hunt to create these poems.

A  Lullaby to Him

Introspective
May I suggest
Immortality
We are not all 
Blessed
Wish there was such a thing
The body is all animal
Will struggle
To serve
Migration into the dusk
Fascinated
I look forward to retirement
Let me tell you
Work is a holy distraction
For these
Approaching years
Being seated
Aware of their animal bodies
Never ask this question again
A lullaby to him

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “A  Lullaby to Him

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Day 139 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in May? This post covers day 139 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 139 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 139 of my 356 days of thankfulness, I am grateful for the poetic journey I started over a year ago. Every day I’m discovering the value of this adventure in wordplay. I think it has made me a better writer. It has given me a valve to express some of my deepest thoughts. I have researched more styles of poetry than I ever knew existed. I am constantly amazed at the creative people who enjoy playing with words. I will never be a great poet, but that is not the point of this exercise. I am grateful for the enjoyment exploring these different poetic styles brings into my life.

This old lady is counting her blessings.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things right in front of your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world is always falling apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

2 thoughts on “Day 139 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

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Without Warning

I ripped another page from the calendar hanging on my kitchen wall. We enter the month of May with thoughts of Spring swimming around in our heads. The sun is shining bright on the days it isn’t raining. The snow vanished into distant memory. This month I plan to explore a poetry style that reminds me of a trickling waterfall. Udit Bhatia created the Cascade poem. There are no rules for rhythm or meter. The layout is simple in that the lines of the first stanza are repeated as the refrain lines in the stanzas that follow. The poem flows like this ABC, xxA, xxB xxC. Add lines to the poem longer. Thus, you are making a cascading effect with words. How hard can that be? This Cascade Poem I titled Without Warning.

Note: I will also be adding Black Out Poems as we go along the way. I plan to keep using this style until the book I’m using runs out of pages for me to play with to create these unique and visual poems. I might as well get started. I’m excited about jogging down this road.

Without Warning

Without Warning

There is not always a calm before the storm
Sometimes there is only heat and humidity
The rumble of thunder in the distance
And the wind starts to blow
And dark clouds fill the sky

I don’t want to set off an unnecessary alarm
This is no time to experience timidity
There’s something evil moving in our direction
And it’s traveling at a fast tempo
There is not always a calm before the storm

The sun lulls us into sweet captivity
A summer day without resistance
It turns deadly on a dime
But how were we to know
Sometimes there is only heat and humidity

Danger spoils our play and threatens our existence
An early warning, a collective shy
Sound the alarm and run for cover
A call to arms and energetic activity
The rumble of thunder in the distance

Tension in the atmosphere starts to grow
It makes a person doubt their mortality
Hearts of  the helpless fill with fear
So many questions that end with why
And the wind starts to blow

So many reasons for a person to cry
Living in a world of mediocrity
A racing pulse to let you feel alive
Nowhere to run, nowhere to go
And dark clouds fill the sky

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

6 thoughts on “Without Warning

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Day 138 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

Another month in 2022 is in my rearview mirror on my road to express thankfulness. This adventure sometimes becomes a challenging task, but I’m discovering so many things to be thankful for each day. Focusing on the positive despite all the tragedy in the world makes me happy. It motivates me to work toward a positive change and being grateful drives away fear. I can see so many potholes in the road, but I start my day searching for the blessings in my life. These events or things might seem small and insignificant, but they add up to a giant pile of happiness at the end of the road. I am inviting you to come along for the ride. Why don’t we all travel the road of gratefulness in May? This post covers day 138 of my 365 days of thankfulness.  

Day 138 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness

On day 138 of my 356 days of thankfulness, I am grateful a friend reminded me that we hadn’t had a tornado around these parts for many years. It is a blessing to know we have managed to avoid destruction because the twisters came every other year for a while. Indiana is no stranger to these powerful storms. Our part of the state was earning the nickname of tornado alley. This reputation is something we can live without earning. The first tornado I remember happened on Psalm Sunday in 1965. During the last one we had, I found myself standing in a room arguing with a Red Cross worker about why a tornado trumped a blood drive. The room was a designated tornado shelter. Students stood in the hallway as the tornado touched down a block away from our location. I am so grateful one of those funnels of destruction hasn’t come our way in years.

This old lady is happy for calm weather.

This old lady has learned thanksgiving is a matter of choice. Don’t let anyone tell you differently. Even in dark places, it is good to seek light. My blessings may not be the same as yours because I’m old. I bet if you dig deep, you can come up with something to be thankful for today. Don’t neglect to see the good things right in front of your face because you hear the world is falling apart. Let me tell you a secret. The world is always falling apart when you focus on the doom and gloom. You won’t always find thankfulness an easy road, but it’s an adventure we can all take together. What are you thankful for today? Leave a comment, and bless my heart. I  am not being sarcastic when I say that. I could use the encouragement as much as the next person.

Who is Molly Shea?

Molly Shea is an accomplished fictional short story writer from Indiana who writes short stories and novels about a fictional town called Tecumseh.  To read more of her short stories and adventures, click here.

Be sure to follow Molly on Twitter!

The Large Garden
I plan to use  Rebecca Hunt's Mr. Chartwell until it runs out …
Day 142 of my 365 Days of Thankfulness
Come along for the ride. Why don't we all travel the road …

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.